Where Do I Go From Here? Practice-Based Evidence Provides Direction

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By Heather Jeng

Sept 21st is World Alzheimer’s Day. Treating a person with a degenerative disease process requires focusing more on intact strengths and environmental factors than deficits. This is referred to as habilitative (vs rehabilitative) intervention. A common treatment challenge is making sound evidence-based decisions when designing and modifying the treatment plan. But evidence does not come only from research studies. In honor of all of our patients with Alzheimer’s, this post explores how evidence is generated every day in treatment sessions, and how clinicians can harness it to provide effective treatment with confidence.

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Dementia & Spousal Caregiver Health

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by Heather Jeng

Earlier this month, I had a long conversation with a client’s wife. She was struggling with guilt and sadness about having moved her husband into long-term care after his needs became too great for her to manage at home. At the same time, though, she admitted that she felt “healthier than I have in years.” It makes intuitive sense that caregiver burden, especially for elderly caregivers, affects one’s own health. But I wondered about the specifics of how this plays out. So for Research Tuesday this month, I did some digging about the health impact of being a spousal caregiver to a person with dementia.

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Cognitive Impairment and Pain: Enhancing Communication

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By Heather Jeng

September is Pain Awareness Month. SLPs in skilled nursing/long-term care frequently work with patients who have acute and/or chronic pain. Yet we receive little training on characteristics of pain and how cognitively intact patients express it, let alone those with cognitive-communication disorders! Please comment below to share any experiences helping a patient with cognitive impairment communicate their pain.    

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